Enough is Enough

When is Humanity Going to Get That We’re All in This Together?

The OK mudra

Posted by majutsu on August 5, 2010

There is an opening into the dimension of the timeless awareness that is the source of everything and in which we are all one. This opening or keyhole is total, personal awareness. There are many tricks and methods to get to that place of being right on the verge of experiencing total, personal awareness in the now. The final step over the precipice of selflessness, however, must be taken by faith – for it is a place where the mind alone cannot lead.
The mind can lead the seeker right up to that precipice, however. In fact, the accumulated store of mantras, mudras, meditations, practices, bhaktis, and so on, is nothing but a collection of tools, pointers to that precipice where grace must take over. In particular, I was reading recently about an analysis of a certain mudra (meditative hand-gesture) that has been used in the past. Sometimes, when reading about ancient mystical traditions, one is struck by the powerful thought and analysis that has gone into to some of these cherished pointers over the years. It might say something about our spiritual and cultural degradation that so many of these mean so little to anyone now.
The mudra being studied in this piece is rather simple – its ramifications are not! The mudra is the thumb touching the forefinger of either hand, as though you were saying, “OK!” The main thought of this mudra is that the experience and the experienced are relative, semantic distinctions, and in reality, they are really one. To begin, touch the thumb to the forefinger as described above. Now, imagine you are the thumb, a stout little creature, and that as you touch and untouch the thumb and forefinger repeatedly, try to be conscious of yourself as a little thumb being stabbed repeatedly by this external, poking first finger. Usually within 30-40 seconds, you can really be conscious of yourself as experiencing thumb and the finger as the experienced. Relax your hand and mind and begin again. This time, try to be conscious of yourself as a slender finger being pounded on repeatedly by this smashing, thick thumb. Again, within an average of 40 seconds or so, you will be conscious of yourself as the experiencing finger being mashed by this oppressive thumb. You can do this repeatedly, back and forth, getting a sense of yourself alternatively as thumb or finger, with the roles of experiencer and experienced changing rapidly. In this way, within a few minutes, you can build a sense, a feeling, of the truth that experiencer and experienced are one event. Both Newtonian physics before and quantum physics now discuss the idea that experiencer and experienced are tied together in a profound and essential relationship. What else is fascinating about this mudra is the readiness with which we, as we play the game, willingly shrink our consciousness down to a body part – “I am a thumb” – when that same consciousness is capable of saying “I am a person” or even expanding to comprehend the entire universe!
So there are two main points that can be internalized on the bodily, experiential level through this exercise: 1) Consciousness can be so easily limited (“I am a thumb, “I am this body part,” or “I am this miserable situation in my life”) that it throws serious doubt on any assumed limits we tend to place on consciousness or true identity. 2) Experiencer and experienced are one, inseparable being. Since we tend to divide the universe into myself and all-that-other-stuff-out-there, experiencer and experienced, we must accept by the mudra that the world and I are really one being in a complex interaction since experiencer and experienced are arbitrary and inseparable. This is why, in quantum mechanics, sometimes, the universe or other system is described in terms of a wave state, a totality of the way things are. This is because the proverbial butterfly flapping her wings in one part of the world might provide the critical molecular stimulus for some crucial physical event elsewhere in the world. With such vast interdependence, it is futile to talk of parts or complete causes.
Also, if the experiencer (me) and the experienced (everything else) are really one totality, having already cast doubt on the assumed limits of our consciousness, we must certainly see that the consciousness and being that pervade the universe must arise from the consciousness of me, my self, much as the finger’s consciousness or “I am-ness” arises from the same source as the thumb’s consciousness or “I am-ness.” That matter-energy field that is me-and-the-world-together sings without limit or border, much like a beam of light keeps going through space indefinitely in the absence of reflection, refraction or absorption. And since the vibration we are contains everything, timelessly, what could there be to bounce off of? So we sing the song of creation, everywhere, timelessly, without border.
What sort of implications does this belief structure have? First of all, personal identity, which requires that certain experiences being acquired or excluded, and that the awareness of the universe being limited to a particular fleshy body, collapses in the faces of an indistinguishable experiencer-experienced pair as well as an inability to draw a border around awareness. It is the artificial structure of the personal identity that causes us chronic unhappiness, experiences we crave or don’t want to have, identities we don’t want to live out etc. This is what causes us to hurt the ones closest to us that we love the most. On a larger scale, our misidentification with race or nation causes genocide and war. Our severing the oneness we share with the earth is the cause of our rampant environmental degradation. Our knowledge that our true identity always was and always will be, unchanged, erases our identification with birth and chronic dread of death. This absence of fear enables us to love ourselves and others effortlessly and fully, celebrating our joy and oneness instead of suffering our divisiveness and fear.
You can see that understanding who we really are is one of the most important tasks we face at this time. The implications of becoming “OK” with who we really are can transform our lives, our relationships, our nations and our planet. If we don’t soon wake from this nightmare and figure out how to become “OK” with our selves, the suffering could be so deep and catastrophic that our compassionate queen may well shred apart everything to end the suffering of delusion as well as to teach the doctrine of love and awareness. There is the path of suffering and the path of reason and practice. The path of suffering is hard and is one I try to save myself and my own children from when possible. Since we need no time to become “right,” merely an instant, let it happen now like sunshine fills a dark room once the window is un-shuttered.

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Villanelle for a Shot of Jameson

Posted by majutsu on July 28, 2010

A shot of whiskey joins ice and warmth
and does not question rocky errant paths
like humans who forget the final step

is but the last and counts as one of all,
the final sum of but forgotten math
a shot of whiskey joins. Ice and warmth,

and pleasure and pain do bind together all,
protect the self with swings of lust and wrath
like humans who forget. The final step

we take to realize we are very small,
a nothing, salt dissolving in a bath.
A shot of whiskey joins ice and warmth

and does not hide in casks or shirk it’s call
to rest in tapestries of days, a single lath,
like humans who forget the final step

arrives, and wanders-past aren’t tragic falls,
just narratives to unknown aftermaths.
A shot of whiskey joins ice and warmth
like humans who forget the final step.

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The Box

Posted by majutsu on July 27, 2010

My wife, who’s a writer, often tells me it’s good for the soul to write. My protestations of lack of craft and sufficient free-time she over-rides by saying that making a sonnet is like making a little toy of words. I love little toys, trinkets, pieces of art, etc as they tend to re-awaken the child-like joy that is the state we aspire to when we seek to find the root one-ness of all, that state of what the Shiva Sutra calls “joy-filled amazement”.

So here’s my naive sonnet filled with fixed formal ideas about stanza purpose, force iambs, and anachronistic contractions: Enjoy! ;)

The Lacquer Box

An antique shop I passed on route to school
had on display a painted lacquer box.
Desiring leafy lacework ‘til I drooled,
I saved to buy the key. My piece, unlocked!

Between my hands, alive, wood resonates,
Enamel tendrils snake ‘round fingertips.
The tiny key’s intelligence innate
pries tumbler pins with clicking, kissing lips.

Once opened, red velour lined coffin walls
entombed a tiny, dazzling, crystal man
with probing sapphire eyes and chiseled jaws
the craftsman’s sacred message held ‘tween his hands.

The secret hid in carvings, secured by locks?
One chip of wood, a simple uncarved block

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The Illusion of the Self

Posted by majutsu on July 21, 2010

The Illusion of the Self

We humans suffer from a serious mental illness which results in terrible crimes against others and the earth. Instead of correctly seeing ourselves as nothing other than the one, formless source of all life, consciousness and being, we identify ourselves with our personal narrative sustained by the running commentary in our heads.

Imagine, as a metaphor, that our thoughts – our past, our relationships, our likes and dislikes, our concepts about the world and its objects – are marbles. Imagine a big bowl filled with these diverse, multi-colored and enchanting marbles. Now, imagine ourselves as obsessive marble collectors, that we have insanely mis-identified our true nature as this collection of marbles. In that case, like an obsessive marble collector, we will perpetually be seeking to add another prize specimen to our collection to “complete” it, or, alternatively, be petrified of losing one of the precious marbles in our prize collection. In this way, we, like the obsessive marble collector, by mis-identifying with our collection of thought-forms, will vacillate between excitement to add another marble (another possession, experience, relationship or achievement) to our collection and fear of losing what we have in the unknown future. Because this chronic unhappiness, this emotional roller-coaster, is the necessary outcome of our mis-identification with the mind, our individual existence and its thought-forms, this unhappiness can never end, despite our stringent, but ultimately irrelevant, attempts to either augment or secure our identity.

As another metaphor, imagine a very skilled metal-smith has fashioned a water fountain, the top of which has an intricate network of twisting conduit-pipes and outlets, fashioned so that water coming from the bottom emerges as transient water-sculptures of birds, angels, people, landscapes, etc., in a dizzying show. In this case, our thought forms are the pipes, the conditioning of our culture, gender, race, and past. This conditioning turns the raw power of formless consciousness, the water in the fountain, into the transient, individual consciousness we experience, the show at the top. This is why we only perceive this cosmic consciousness as the transient dance of forms we call our individual life, and this is why it is so easy to mis-identify with the transient, individual self. This is also how it is that cosmic consciousness becomes imprisoned in our individual self. But it is the feeding of the cosmic consciousness that gives us life and is the source for any new idea we have, impulse to act, or creative endeavor. However, because of the conditioning of thought-forms, our creativity and cosmic consciousness become enslaved to supply the freewill to the actions we create to chase after future objects or achievements, or to run away from fears we may imagine. But as soon as one of the watery doves or other transient thought forms we experience disappears, we see the cosmic consciousness once again fall to reality and return to the source, much like the water from the top of the fountain falls back down and soaks into the earth and eventually back to the sea.

By learning to cease identifying with our individual selves and its thought-forms, we may experience the source of cosmic consciousness. We may be spared the agony of recurrent cycles of excitement and fear that ultimately make us miserable.

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Notes from the zafu

Posted by majutsu on July 8, 2010

I recently acquired a zafu while buying one for my wife. I haven’t sat in about fifteen years. When I did sit, without the purifying that suffering over time provides, I’m afraid I was better at observing the trappings of Buddhism: sitting, dietary rules, and a book collection, as opposed to being anywhere close to an understanding of the profound change required in terms of the way one interacts with the world in order to have accepted the teaching of the Buddhist path. Of course, over time, one loses many things: people, money, objects, and opportunities, and this enables you to accept reality in its ups and downs versus building an elaborate fantasy world in the head to rage against the world-as-it-is on a stage built to your design. This unadorned awareness is the beginning of sitting and practice.
While I no longer think of myself as a Buddhist, and find Shaivism and Christianity interesting as well, meditation draws to mind, for many people, Buddhist teachings. Buddhism encourages de-attachment from the ego-centered world. Certainly, the source of much suffering in this world is people wanting many things when they really need nothing. Not only are “small-scale” sufferings like depression and anxiety caused by this wanting, but many large-scale sufferings like war, poverty and environmental damage to an extent incompatible with sustaining human life. But chasing down whiffs of ego and snuffing them out can be tiring and unproductive as I know from experience.
I prefer to focus on “the now” because it’s one of the few English word/concepts that is by itself formless and inconceivable. Grasping now is like trying to stop a river. There is no hunger right now, no poverty, no family, no possessions. If, for example, you were sad about not having friends, you could realize that if you had them or not, you could hardly make use of them right there at that moment on that zafu. If your partner is dying this week, s/he is not dying right then at the second on that zafu, and you don’t even have a partner at that instant on that zafu. You can’t lose your job at that second on that zafu. At that second, there is no oil spill, no political corruption, no environmental damage. All these concepts are contingent upon the passage of time. This practice negates the illusions of ego while performing a positive activity, being intensely aware of this very moment. In this precise moment, rather easily, a very peaceful, beautiful nothing is experienced – what I suppose many would call experiencing God. It is very easy to expand this awareness into compassion for every human being you meet. It is very easy to expand this awareness into an experience of the Earth as a cohesive whole that we should respect, love and enjoy.
I hope my thoughts and tips on sitting may be helpful to others. I know Eckhart Tolle and the Shiva sutras have been helpful to me. I hope I have communicated my internalization of some teachings well. Please share any thoughts or tips on sitting.

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Experiencing Now

Posted by majutsu on June 28, 2010

Experiencing Now
I’ve been reading some Eckhart Tolle and listening to his lectures. In summary, I can say so far that it seems to be a very lucid, modern description of the state of being fully aware in the present moment. I also find this state to be the mystical core of all faiths that can generate saints, or loving beings in love with all being. Therefore, being a long-time seeker myself and being interested in the core experience that sustains and uplifts humanity, I’ve become motivated to start putting into practice some of these teachings.
While everyday life, in brief interactions with the myriad types of people in the world, provides plenty of opportunities for practice, the essence of the practice is to remain centered in the midst of these interactions. I think remembering and being focused upon something one has never experienced in the first place could be difficult, therefore it seems that I might need a remedial practice to prepare for the greater practice that is life.
In Tolle’s teachings, as well as mystical Christianity, Buddhism, and Sufism, many practical techniques are taught. Those that make sense immediately to me, that I might consider following are as follows: silence, space, inner body, and mind watching. All of these seem consistent and obtainable with daily practice on a cushion.
Silence meditation involves sitting and listening to all the sounds of the world. Then try in that to hear the silence, the vast silence from which all those sounds emanate and to which they return. Space meditation is the same sort of idea, but visually or conceptual try to feel the space in which all things are. Inner body meditation involves feeling the life within your body, within each cell. The whole being is one pulsing energy field of life. Instead of imaging this or conceptualizing it, try to feel it, tactilely. The feeling might start first as tingling or warmth, but let it engulf the whole organism. This particular meditation appeals to me because it is frequently lauded in Western mystical tradition and is said to be the vegetable body, or the place magick, the crossroads, the meeting of the spiritual realm and the material. Mind watching is the practice of watching the mind like a rabbit hole, waiting to see what pops out. Note it without judgment and wait again. It is fascinating in doing this how much of the content of the mind is based on regrets and wounds of the past, or fantasies or fears of the future! The mind seems to fight Now viciously at every step, attacking the true self most cruelly.
I hope to take up one or more of these meditation practices daily soon. Please share your practice and experiences as well. I will share my experiences as they unfold.

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Pillars of Empire Must Fall

Posted by majutsu on June 22, 2010

The Pillars of Empire
Long ago, after Sumer was destroyed, the world faced a dark age as one of the shining lights of world civilization had sprung up virtually out of nowhere, and just as quickly, now had faced its sudden demise. The secrets of the Sumerians, including natural science, astronomy, agricultural techniques, a functional political system, warfare tactics, and most significantly, theological practices and ritual, were facing extinction. The maintenance of these secrets, literally the keys to mankind’s control over the earth and its inhabitants, were passed to the Egyptians. In particular, these secrets were passed in the form of a king-making ceremony exercised by the priestly class. For an Egyptian to truly be accepted as king, he or she had to undergo this ceremony and receive these secrets to direct the society that was his or her charge. To question the authority of this king and to support another contender would have been foolish, as it would put a person on the throne with inadequate knowledge of any of these critical functions of governance. The king, who made the “rocks sing” with the almost magical act of writing, who knew the movements of the heavens, the most opportune times to plant, and how to construct fabulous dwellings through architecture, most certainly would be perceived as god-like, if not the sun-god, Amen-Ra, incarnate on earth.

By the time we reach Seqenenre Tao II, the ruler of the last of the Theban kingdoms at the end of the Middle Period, one might imagine that these “secrets” were of little use. If, long ago, a king had taught some ancient forbearer the techniques of agriculture, that farmer no doubt taught his children and his children’s children the family farming techniques. Similar arguments can be made regarding writing, which disseminated widely in the priestly class, and government, which can be absorbed by osmosis in participation, etc. One then sees that the king-making ceremony had reached rather a point of being formalism and superstition. While for the sake of the superstitious and tradition, the king-making ceremony was still needed, but practically not essential. No better proof of the new freedom to question the king’s inalienable right to rule was the fact that mighty kingships were being contested at that time, and there is clear evidence from the mummy that Sequenenre Tao II was assassinated by 3 blows to the head. The contenders to the throne felt that while Sequenenre Tao’s authority could certainly be challenged, they felt that for the mass of common people, it was perhaps still useful to keep the king-making ceremony as a ritual of legitimacy.

As is well known, through the work of Eisenman, Knight, Lomas, and others, the king was approached by 3 assassins at noon prayer, asked to divulge the ceremony of king-making (which probably involved a ritualistic death and resurrection, perhaps assisted by drugs and a theatrical re-enacting of Osiris’s journey) and he refused, resulting in his death and the loss of the god-making ceremony. This event is the basis of the legend of Hiram Abif as enacted by the Freemasons. Finding themselves without a king-making ceremony, the now-ruling conspirators proceeded to make one up. This new king-making ceremony, in all its uselessness and superstition, became the foundation of Egyptian theology, the pyramids, and several major world-religions.

Moses was an Egyptian, well inside the court circle. The “Jews” were a loose group of unrelated tribes that Moses took leadership of, skilled artisans and an intelligent but warlike people that had been taken into slavery by the Egyptians for their utility. Moses took with him the fake king ceremony and that ever-powerful desire to rule and dominate others, took his cadre of misfit warriors, and then ran through Palestine, killing and raping town after town of men, women, children and animals as he went. The ultimate goal was to build a kingdom of the sun God Amen-Ra united with law and legitimized by the king-making ceremony. This was continued by the Judges, David, Solomon etc. It is in Solomon that we have a reconstruction of the temple and ceremony in full and in public. His connection with this lifestyle was so well known centuries after his life that the Bible goes to great lengths to rationalize his “paganism” and “demonology.” In general, the murderous, treacherous, and immoral behavior of the Jewish kings shows how well this belief in God-hood and divine right-to-rule can justify literally any action of self-aggrandizement as “good.”
In Solomon’s temple we see a door facing east with two pillars, representing the upper and lower kingdoms that were united to make Egypt. Over time, these pillars became symbols of the priest and the king with the arch-stone or cornerstone being the united kingdom.

By the time we get to the time of Jesus, apocalyptic fervor was in full swing. It was expected there would be a priestly messiah and a political messiah, and that when they were united together, there would be an eternal Jewish kingdom and Jerusalem would never again be held by non-Jews such as the Romans. It was widely believed that John the Baptist was the priestly Messiah. This is why the Bible goes through such great length to link John the Baptist favorably with Christ. The problem is that before the two could stand in the Temple of Jerusalem and perform their ultimately pointless king-making ceremony, John the Baptist had his head cut off. It seems that Jesus somewhere decided that he was both Messiahs in one body. This did not seem plausible to many of the time, which explains both Jesus’s lack of significant historical impact as well as the continued proposal of single and dual Messiahs. Jesus’s brother James (aka Jacob) also developed quite a following. He was the leader of the Qumran group, authors of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Since Solomon etc had performed the rites and yet the Jews were under foreign occupation, there must be an explanation to the failure of the “magic.” The answer, then as always, was that the nonsense magic didn’t work because the people weren’t “pure” enough. With the ritual ablutions, extreme diet and prayer, the Qumran community offered the hope of spiritual revival and subsequent political freedom. The idea then became that Jesus and his brother James, like Moses and Aaron before, would make the ideal pillars. The garden of Gesthemane was outside the east gate, and other scrolls suggest Jesus and James were either about to do the rite or just finished it when Jesus was captured. Jesus – the political one – Jesus Christ, “king” was captured, as was James, the son-of-God, aka Bar-abbas. The Romans, knowing their enemy well, knew only one pillar of two had to be killed to destroy a movement, so they gave the Jews a choice, Jesus king of the Jews or Jesus Barabbas. James had more clout and believability, or perhaps the Jews thought death would be no obstacle for the rite, much like with Osiris, so they let James, Jesus Barabbas, go.

Somewhere around this time, a gentile man, a Roman citizen, with a Jewish ancestry but no understanding of the culture of Judaism was assigned the task of quelling Jewish rebellion. He seems to have been successful and to have earned quite a name as Saul, effectively quelling rebellion. He was on his way to Qumran (aka “Damascus” not in Syria, but near the Dead Sea), whether to quell their sect or indulge a long-dormant desire to find out who he “was,” but either way, this very psychologically charged journey changed this man. He apparently met with James and heard the initiate stories and sayings of Jesus, but despite the 3-year requirement of mastery at Qumran, left after days with full understanding – to the continual consternation of James. Not only did he naturally Hellenicize the story, focusing on the Dionysian slaughter of Jesus, but he simply started his own church with his own mythos. It appears for some time that James, like his brother Jesus, entertained the idea of being both pillars in one, but he was buried to his waist, stoned, and then clubbed finally in the head. His influence had grown too great, and the Maccabean revolt was immanent too. Whether they performed the rite or not, it was clear the pillars were dead, no other candidates were on the horizon, and there is a fair chance the rite with both pillars had been performed once or several times to no effect. Rome ruled Jerusalem and the church of Jesus had been hijacked and turned into a mystery cult by a ladder-climbing Roman citizen.

Seeing the end was near, the Qumran community had buried the scrolls, the most secret under the temple at Jerusalem. Paul had nominated himself the king (popes today still wear the bi-lobed hat of Egypt’s upper and lower kingdom united), made Jesus the priestly pillar, conveniently dead, and removed Jewish law and Jewish political aspirations from the earth. Herod razed the temple to the ground. Eventually the Roman Catholic Church and then the Muslims would control Jerusalem, and orthodox Jews still purify, wait for the rite to be performed, and themselves to rule the world. The Templars, digging for treasure under the Temple ruins, found the scrolls. They went within 50-years from being darlings of the church to slaughtered on Friday 13th. They had unlocked the secret of the false church, and those who were not slaughtered had to go underground in the secret societies of Freemasonry. The focus centered on the secrets and the ritual, and the focus, as the rites were performed in the early Celtic church, Scotland, France etc, began to be solely based on a philosophy of world rule by uniting the spiritual (the square or ruler) and the political (the compass symbolizing a king whose rule radiates out from a central point). This would become the square and compass of Freemasonry as well as the Star of David (a sign that first is seen in Judaism under Greek influence).
We see the same errors of thinking in terms of domination and hierarchy generate horror after horror for centuries. America still derives much of its arrogance from the assumption of king rituals, the right-to-rule, and rabid support of the criminal “state” of Israel built entirely on Palestinian genocide. Women, “inferior races”, moral groups like homosexuals and the promiscuous, and those who seek ritual through non-national rites (like shamans and the battle on shamanistic citizens through the “War on Drugs”) are continually attacked with a ferocity that defies any reason or attempt at apologetics. The time for a paradigm-shift, the rejection of Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Nationalism, and Racism, is at hand. An economics built on cannibalizing our brothers and sisters around the earth we share cannot stand. We cannot breathe our air, drink our water, or eat our food, no footstep can be taken without being stained with blood. The legacy of Egypt must die. We must approach the earth as a Commons shared by us all, in which we all have a part, a share to protect for ourselves and our children.

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Tai Chi Crosstraining

Posted by majutsu on June 10, 2010

In the spirit of conjugated periodization, a term made popular by Louie Simmons and Westside Powerlifting, I have added Tai Chi to my training.
I currently train in the Westside method for bench, squat and deadlift, equipped. I am particularly focusing on bringing up the bench and the squat right now. Westside powerlifting uses maximum effort day and a dynamic day. Maximum effort means to achieve a one-rep maximum on a particular movement. It is important, however, to get enough volume in reps to provide growth. So I usually go from 80 – 95% of my one-rep maximum in a progressive manner. Maximum effort movements for bench right now are floor presses or a shirted (open-backed poly-ply – Titan) bench. Maximum effort movements for squat are box squats, rack deadlifts or good mornings. Dynamic is to improve one’s explosiveness and speed. Methods of training this modality include using bands or chains. Bands and chains have relatively more pull at the end extension of the movement than at the bottom, encouraging the lifter to explosively blow past the beginning and middle of the movement to fight the increased resistance at the end, developing speed. I do shirted bench and box squats with bands and chains.
Also, powerlifting involves training one’s GPP (General Physical Preparedness). I do this through walking with my wife and the dogs at night, swimming, and most recently, Tai Chi.
I have always been interested in Tai Chi. I have done yoga and martial arts, but never Tai Chi somehow. Tai Chi is a part of Kung Fu that is a “Soft Style”. There are soft styles and hard styles. Hard styles involve striking and blocking. Soft styles involves yielding, re-channeling aggressive energies, taking control of them, and adding the slightest directive tap at a vulnerable moment at a precise time. Tai Chi is very flowing and circular. Practically, I feel it has benefited my lower back and knees, strengthening my squat, as well as helped me to feel the communication of energy between different parts of my body, strengthening my bench by providing a better power transfer from my legs to my chest.
Chi is an interesting concept too. Chi is basically life-energy. Freud called it libido and saw it infusing career choice, aspirations, art and philosophy, as well as sex. Ancient mystery groups thought there were seven “bodies” to a human. The three of greatest importance here are the mineral body, the animal body, and the vegetable body. The mineral body is the sphere of physical materialism. The animal body represents our everyday consciousness, the mind. The vegetable body, as represented by your solar plexus, i.e. stomach, is the point where the animal and mineral body interact. Plants, living things, are certainly not mineral like rocks or animal like a deer. They are a tie between the worlds. Tai Chi focuses on this vegetable body, the subtle shell of man that enables magic.

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Spring stump after storm

Posted by majutsu on May 23, 2010

Dead tree, lightning struck
Holds busy ants working in spring
Scattered mist of life within.

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The Unicorn of Route 13

Posted by majutsu on May 17, 2010

The Unicorn of Route 13

My skull has opened up again
between and above my two eyes.
Through this quarter-sized doorway,
aberrant brain reaches out in a long horn,
a tunnel to unimpeded mind.
Little eyes of the many-eyed me
have fallen off and rolled.
One, under the passenger seat,
or driving — watching as the coffin-lid
of bony skull is shut by
A trickster doorman waving “Bye.”.
Coffin lid closed and dead
to me out there,
I begin to dream
of men raising barns together,
because that’s what you did on Tuesday,
twice a moon.
Or else, in what barn would you live?
The game of hide and seek
already started, I rest my horned head
to count with eyes closed
in the virgin’s lap made
by my two arms and the steering wheel.
I arrive at work.

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